Call Now : +855 12 765 732
Bookmark and Share

Angkor Tour Packages

 

One-day Visit: Visit Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom

Angkor Wat: built in early 12th century by king Suryavarman II (reigned 1113-1150) in dedication to Vishnu. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu monument of Angkor group and one of the most intact, is an architectural masterpiece. It perfection, balance, proportions, reliefs and sculpture make it one of the finest monuments in the world. This temple is an expression of Khmer art at its highest point development. A study has shown that when Angkor Wat was laid out by the Khmers originally, the distance between certain architectural elements of the temple reflected numbers which were related to Hindu mythology an cosmology. The positions of the bas-reliefs were regulated, for example, by solar movements. Scenes on the east-west sides reflect those relating to the rising and setting of the sun.

Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire, was grander than any city in Europe at the time and must have supported a considerable population which may have been as high as one million. Within the city walls were the residences of the king, his family and officials, military officers and priests while the rest of the people lived outside of the enclosure. Continue to the Bayon, the favourite monument among visitors. The two temples evoke similar aesthetic responses yet are different in purpose, design, architecture and decoration. Zhou Daguan, the Chinese emissary who provided the only first-hand account of the Khmers, described the splendour of Angkor Thom: At the centre of the kingdom rises a Golden Tower ( Bayon) flanked by more than twenty lesser towers and several hundred stone chambers. On the eastern side is a golden bridge guarded by two lions of gold, one on each side, with eight golden Buddhas spaced along the stone chambers. Then continue to Baphuon built in the middle of 11th century dedicated to Shiva. According to Zhou Daguan, the North of the Golden Tower rises the Tower of Bronze (Baphuon), higher even than the Golden Tower: a truly astonishing spectacle, with more than ten chambers at its base. Continue to the ancient royal palace where the kings of Angkor lived. Like much of Angkor Thom, the residences of the king, and those who worked in the palace, were built of wood and have disintegrated, leaving no traces. Phimeanakas (aerial palace), located in inside the Royal Palace compound, was the temple where the king worshipped. It must originally have been crowned with golden pinnacles, as Zhou Daguan described it as the '' Tower of Gold''. Tarrace of the elephants: built in the end 12th century by Jayavarman VI, located directly in front of the Royal Palace enclosure wall. Terrace of Leper King: built in the same date of terrace of elephants and by the same king. It was used as crematorium for the king's family. Ta Prohm: built by Jayavarman VI, a Buddhist monastery dedicated to his mother shrouded in the jungle, the temple of  Ta Prohm  is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigantic roots over, under and in between the stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof above the structures.

Price:

1 person=117$
2 people=154$
3 people=195$
4 people=238$
5 people=275$
6 people=312$
7 people=350$
8 people=387$
9 people=435$
10 people=475$

Inclusions:
-Official English speaking tour guide
- A good A/C car or van with a driver
-Cold pure drinking water and wet tissue during the tour
-One-day pass for sightseeing in Angkor

-Transfer in or out services(during the tour only).

Exclusions:

Hote Rates

All other fees not mentioned above

If you have any questions related to the above itinerary, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are happy to discuss any changes.

Two-Day Visit

Day 1: Visit Angkor Wat: built in early 12th century by king Suryavarman II (regned 1113-1150) in dedication to Vishnu. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu monument of Angkor group and one of the most intact, is an architectural masterpiece. It perfection, balance, proportions, reliefs and sculture make it one of the finest monuments in the world. This temple is an expression of Khmer art at its highest point development. A study has shown that when Angkor Wat was laid out by the Khmers originally, the distance between certain architectual elements of the temple reflected numbers which were related to Hidu mythology ans cosmology. The positions of the bas-reliefs were regulated, for example, by solar movements. Scenes on the east-west sides reflect those relating to the rising and setting of the sun.

Visit Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire, was grander than any city in Europe at the time and must have supported a considerable poppulation which may have been as high as one million. Within the city walls were the residences of the king, his family and officials, military officers and priests while the rest of the people lived outside of the enclosure. Continue to the Bayon, the favourite monument among visitors. The two temples evoke similar aesthetic responses yet are different in purpose, design, architecture and decoration. Zhou Daguan, the chinese emissary who provided the only first-hand account of the Khmers, described the splendour of Angkor Thom: At the centre of the kingdom rises a Golden Tower ( Bayon) flanked by more than twenty lesser towers and several hundred stone chambers. On the eastern side is a golden bridge guarded by two lions of gold, one on each side, with eight golden Buddhas spaced along the stone chambers. Then continue to Baphuon built in the middle of 11th century dedicated to Shiva. According to Zhou Daguan, the North of the Golden Tower rises the Tower of Bronze (Baphuon), higher even than the Golden Tower: a truly astonishing spectacle, with more than ten chambers at its base. Continue to the ancient royal palace where the kings of Angkor lived. Like much of Angkor Thom, the residences of the king, and those who worked in the palace, were built of wood and have disintergrated, leaving no traces. Phimeanakas (aerial palace), locoated in inside the Royal Palace compound, was the temple where the king worshipped. It must orginally have been crowned with a golden pinnacles, as Zhou Daguan described it as the '' Tower of Gold''. Tarrace of the elephants: built in the end 12th century by Jayavarman VI, located directly in front of the Royal Palace enclosure wall. Terrace of Leper King: built in the same date of terrace of elephants and by the same king. It was used as crematorium for the king's family. have been one the of the . Ta Prohm: built by Jayavarman VI, a Buddhist monastery dedicated to his mother shrouded in the jungle, the temple of Ta Prohm is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigiant roots over, under and in between the stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof above the structures.

Day 2: Visit Preah Khan: the ''sacred sword'', an extensive 56 hectares Buddhist complex built in AD 1191 as a monastery and centre for learning by king Jayavarman VII (AD1181-1220) and dedicated to his father. The inscription indicates that Preah Khan was built on a battle site where Jayavarman VII finally defeated the Chams. In those days it was know as Nagarajayacri which translated from Siames means '' The City of Preah Khan'' or ''The City of The Sacred Sword''. The sacred sword has indeed a long history in Khmer tradition. Visit Neak Pean: built by king Jayavarman VII, located in the centre of the Jayatataka '' reservoir'' called North Baray and placed on the same exis as Preah Khan. Orginally, it could only be reached by boat. It is a small, somewhat out-of-the-way temple with a unique layout, decoration and symbolism. It have served as a place where pilgrims could go and take the water, both physically and symbolically - the Khmer equivalent of a spa. VisitTa Som: built by king Jayavarman VII, a Buddhist temple (dedicated to the father of the king). It is a small, quiet temple and affords a delightful undisturbed visit. A significant feature of Ta Som is the growth of a huge ficus tree on the east gateway, which provides a dramaic example of nature and art entwined. Visit East Mebon: built by king Rajendravarman II (reigned AD944-968) dedicated to Shiva, an ancestor temple in memory of the parents of the king. The East Mebon and its neighbour Pre Rup were built by the same king, just nine years apart, and are similar in plan, construction and decoration. A major difference, however, is that the East Mebon once stood on a small island in the middle of the Eastern Baray, which was a large body of water (2 by 7 kilometres) fed by the Siem Reap River. Visit Pre Rup: 'turn, or change, the body', was called the 'City of the East' by Philippe Stern, the Assistant Curator of the Musee Guimet in Paris. The boldness of the architectural design is superb and gives the temple fine balance, scale and proportion. The temple is close in style to the East Mebon, although it was built several years later. it is a temple-mountain symbolising Mount Meru, the mythical mountain. The Cambodian have always regarded this temple as having funerary associations, but it is true function is uncertain. Nevertheless, the name Pre Rup recalls one of the ritual of cremation, in which the silhouette of the body of the deceased, outlined with its ashes, is successively represented according to different orientations. Some archaeologists believe that the large vat located at the base of east stairway to the central area was used at cremations.

Price
1 person=225$
2 people=287$
3 people=350$
4 people=415$
5 people=477$
6 people=540$
7 people=605$
8 people=665$
9 people=725$
10 people=787$

Inclusions:

-Official English speaking tour guide

- A good A/C car or van with a driver

-Cold pure drinking water and cold wet tissue during the tour

-Two-day pass for sightseeing in Angkor

-Transfer in and out services (during the tour only).

Exclusions:

- Hotel rate

- All other fees not mentioned above

If you have any questions related to the above itinerary, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are happy to discuss any changes.

Three-Day Visit:

Day 1: Vsit Roluos Group

The three temples of Preah Ko, Bakong and Lolei are clustered together near the modern village of Roluos, and extend over an area of three kilometers east of the Tonle Sap. The Roluos group, dating from the late ninth century, is the earliest extend site of the Angkor period that is open to visitors. The three temples belonging to this important group have similar characteristics of architecture, decoration, materials and construction methods, which combine to reveal the beginning of the classic period of Khmer art. The brick structures are decorated with magnificent sandstone deities in niches and lintels, all of which are in remarkably good condition. Preah Ko: erected by Indravarman I in the late 9th century in dedication to his defied ancestors in 879. There are inscriptions in Sanskrit on the door frame. Bakong: built and dedicated to Shiva by Indravarman I, this is the largest and most interesting of the Roluos Group temples and still has an active Buddhist monastery. Lolei: Built on an islet by Yasovarman I (who ruled from 889 to 910), the founder of the first city of Angkor. The sandstone carvings in the niches of the temple are notable as are the Sanskrit inscriptions on the doorposts. After Roluos Group your driver and your private guide will take you Artisans d'Angkor, the biggest workshop where you can enjoy their lively work of silver plating, silk weaving wood and stone carving. Artisans d’Angkor has been awarded by the highest authority for supporting craft producers: UNESCO.

Day 2: Visit sunris at Angkor Wat then visit Angkor Thom

Angkor Wat: built in early 12th century by king Suryavarman II (reigned 1113-1150) in dedication to Vishnu. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu monument of Angkor group and one of the most intact, is an architectural masterpiece. It perfection, balance, proportions, reliefs and sculpture make it one of the finest monuments in the world. This temple is an expression of Khmer art at its highest point development. A study has shown that when Angkor Wat was laid out by the Khmers originally, the distance between certain architectural elements of the temple reflected numbers which were related to Hindu mythology an cosmology. The positions of the bas-reliefs were regulated, for example, by solar movements. Scenes on the east-west sides reflect those relating to the rising and setting of the sun.

Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer empire, was grander than any city in Europe at the time and must have supported a considerable population which may have been as high as one million. Within the city walls were the residences of the king, his family and officials, military officers and priests while the rest of the people lived outside of the enclosure. Enter by the monumental South Gate over a causeway lined on either side by statues of demons and gods, each carrying a giant Naga. Continue to the Bayon, the favourite monument among visitors. The two temples evoke similar aesthetic responses yet are different in purpose, design, architecture and decoration. Zhou Daguan, the Chinese emissary who provided the only first-hand account of the Khmers, described the splendour of Angkor Thom: At the centre of the kingdom rises a Golden Tower ( Bayon) flanked by more than twenty lesser towers and several hundred stone chambers. On the eastern side is a golden bridge guarded by two lions of gold, one on each side, with eight golden Buddhas spaced along the stone chambers. Then continue to Baphuon built in the middle of 11th century dedicated to Shiva. According to Zhou Daguan, the North of the Golden Tower rises the Tower of Bronze (Baphuon), higher even than the Golden Tower: a truly astonishing spectacle, with more than ten chambers at its base. Continue to the ancient royal palace where the kings of Angkor lived. Like much of Angkor Thom, the residences of the king, and those who worked in the palace, were built of wood and have disintegrated, leaving no traces. Phimeanakas (aerial palace), located in inside the Royal Palace compound, was the temple where the king worshipped. It must originally have been crowned with golden pinnacles, as Zhou Daguan described it as the '' Tower of Gold''. Tarrace of the elephants: built in the end 12th century by Jayavarman VI, located directly in front of the Royal Palace enclosure wall. Terrace of Leper King: built in the same date of terrace of elephants and by the same king. It was used as crematorium for the king's family. Leave for Ta Keo before you continue to last most famous one ''Ta Prohm''. Ta Keo is one of the great temple-mountain at Angkor. It was never completed because it was struck by lightning. Had it been finished, Ta Keo, undoubtedly, would have been one the of the finest temples at Angkor. Ta Prohm: built by Jayavarman VI, a Buddhist monastery dedicated to his mother shrouded in the jungle, the temple of Ta Prohm is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigantic roots over, under and in between the stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof above the structures.

Day 3: Visit Preah Khan ( the City of Sacred Sword)

Preah Khan: the ''sacred sword'', an extensive 56 hectares Buddhist complex built in AD 1191 as a monastery and centre for learning by king Jayavarman VII (AD1181-1220) and dedicated to his father. The inscription indicates that Preah Khan was built on a battle site where Jayavarman VII finally defeated the Chams. In those days it was know as Nagarajayacri which translated from Siamese means '' The City of Preah Khan'' or ''The City of The Sacred Sword''. The sacred sword has indeed a long history in Khmer tradition. Visit Neak Pean: built by king Jayavarman VII, located in the centre of the Jayatataka '' reservoir'' called North Baray and placed on the same exis as Preah Khan. Originally, it could only be reached by boat. It is a small, somewhat out-of-the-way temple with a unique layout, decoration and symbolism. It has served as a place where pilgrims could go and take the water, both physically and symbolically - the Khmer equivalent of a spa.

Vist Ta Som: built by king Jayavarman VII, a Buddhist temple (dedicated to the father of the king). It is a small, quiet temple and affords a delightful undisturbed visit. A significant feature of Ta Som is the growth of a huge ficus tree on the east gateway, which provides a dramatic example of nature and art entwined.

Visit East Mebon: built by king Rajendravarman II (reigned AD944-968) dedicated to Shiva, an ancestor temple in memory of the parents of the king. The East Mebon and its neighbour Pre Rup were built by the same king, just nine years apart, and are similar in plan, construction and decoration. A major difference, however, is that the East Mebon once stood on a small island in the middle of the Eastern Baray, which was a large body of water (2 by 7 kilometers) fed by the Siem Reap River.

Visit Pre Rup: 'turn, or change, the body', was called the 'City of the East' by Philippe Stern, the Assistant Curator of the Musee Guimet in Paris. The boldness of the architectural design is superb and gives the temple fine balance, scale and proportion. The temple is close in style to the East Mebon, although it was built several years later. it is a temple-mountain symbolising Mount Meru, the mythical mountain. The Cambodian have always regarded this temple as having funerary associations, but it is true function is uncertain. Nevertheless, the name Pre Rup recalls one of the ritual of cremation, in which the silhouette of the body of the deceased, outlined with its ashes, is successively represented according to different orientations. Some archaeologists believe that the large vat located at the base of east stairway to the central area was used at cremations.

Price:

1 person=$315

2people=$377

3people=$505

4people=$567

5people=$630

6people=$695

7people=$757

8people=$825

9people=$887

10people=$950

Inclusion:

-English speaking guide

-a good A/C car or van with a driver

-Cold pure drinking water and cold wet tissue

-Three-day pass for sightseeing in Angkor

-Extra Charge for sunrise

-Transfer in and out services during the tour only

Exclusion:

Hotel Rate

 All other fees not mentioned above

If you have any questions related to the above itinerary, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are happy to discuss any changes.

Four-Day Visit:

Day 1: Vsit Roluos Group

The three temples of Preah Ko, Bakong and Lolei are clustered together near the modern village of Roluos, and extend over an area of three kilometers east of the Tonle Sap. The Roluos group, dating from the late ninth century, is the earliest extend site of the Angkor period that is open to visitors. The three temples belonging to this important group have similar characteristics of architecture, decoration, materials and construction methods, which combine to reveal the beginning of the classic period of Khmer art. The brick structures are decorated with magnificent sandstone deities in niches and lintels, all of which are in remarkably good condition. Preah Ko: erected by Indravarman I in the late 9th century in dedication to his defied ancestors in 879. There are inscriptions in Sanskrit on the door frame. Bakong: built and dedicated to Shiva by Indravarman I, this is the largest and most interesting of the Roluos Group temples and still has an active Buddhist monastery. Lolei: Built on an islet by Yasovarman I (who ruled from 889 to 910), the founder of the first city of Angkor. The sandstone carvings in the niches of the temple are notable as are the Sanskrit inscriptions on the doorposts. After Roluos Group your driver and your private guide will take you Artisans d'Angkor, the biggest workshop where you can enjoy their lively work of silver plating, silk weaving wood and stone carving. Artisans d’Angkor has been awarded by the highest authority for supporting craft producers: UNESCO.

Day 2: Visit sunrise at Angkor Wat then visit Angkor Thom

Angkor Wat: built in early 12th century by king Suryavarman II (reigned 1113-1150) in dedication to Vishnu. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu monument of Angkor group and one of the most intact, is an architectural masterpiece. It perfection, balance, proportions, reliefs and sculpture make it one of the finest monuments in the world. This temple is an expression of Khmer art at its highest point development. A study has shown that when Angkor Wat was laid out by the Khmers originally, the distance between certain architectural elements of the temple reflected numbers which were related to Hindu mythology an cosmology. The positions of the bas-reliefs were regulated, for example, by solar movements. Scenes on the east-west sides reflect those relating to the rising and setting of the sun. 

Visit Angkor Thom, the last capital of Khmer Empire, was grander than any city in Europe at the time and must have supported a considerable population which may have been as high as one million. Within the city walls were the residences of the king, his family and officials, military officers and priests while the rest of the people lived outside of the enclosure. Continue to Bayon, the most favourite temple among tourists. The two temples evoke similar aesthetic responses yet are different in purpose, design, architecture and decoration. Zhou Daguan, the Chinese emissary who provided the only first-hand account of the Khmers, described the splendour of Angkor Thom: At the centre of the kingdom rises a Golden Tower ( Bayon) flanked by more than twenty lesser towers and several hundred stone chambers. On the eastern side is a golden bridge guarded by two lions of gold, one on each side, with eight golden Buddhas spaced along the stone chambers. Then continue to Baphuon built in the middle of 11th century dedicated to Shiva. According to Zhou Daguan, the North of the Golden Tower rises the Tower of Bronze (Baphuon), higher even than the Golden Tower: a truly astonishing spectacle, with more than ten chambers at its base. Continue to the ancient royal palace where the kings of Angkor lived. Like much of Angkor Thom, the residences of the king, and those who worked in the palace, were built of wood and have disintegrated, leaving no traces. Phimeanakas (aerial palace), located in inside the Royal Palace compound, was the temple where the king worshipped. It must originally have been crowned with golden pinnacles, as Zhou Daguan described it as the '' Tower of Gold''. Tarrace of the elephants: built in the end 12th century by Jayavarman VI, located directly in front of the Royal Palace enclosure wall. Terrace of Leper King: built in the same date of terrace of elephants and by the same king. It was used as crematorium for the king's family. Leave for Ta Keo before you continue to last most famous one ''Ta Prohm''. Ta Keo is one of the great temple-mountain at Angkor. It was never completed because it was struck by lightning. Had it been finished, Ta Keo, undoubtedly, would have been one the of the finest temples at Angkor. Ta Prohm: built by Jayavarman VI, a Buddhist monastery dedicated to his mother shrouded in the jungle, the temple of Ta Prohm is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigantic roots over, under and in between the stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof above the structures.

Day 3: Visit Preah Khan ( the City of Sacred Sword)

Preah Khan: the ''sacred sword'', an extensive 56 hectares Buddhist complex built in AD 1191 as a monastery and centre for learning by king Jayavarman VII (AD1181-1220) and dedicated to his father. The inscription indicates that Preah Khan was built on a battle site where Jayavarman VII finally defeated the Chams. In those days it was know as Nagarajayacri which translated from Siamese means '' The City of Preah Khan'' or ''The City of The Sacred Sword''. The sacred sword has indeed a long history in Khmer tradition. Visit Neak Pean: built by king Jayavarman VII, located in the centre of the Jayatataka '' reservoir'' called North Baray and placed on the same exis as Preah Khan. Originally, it could only be reached by boat. It is a small, somewhat out-of-the-way temple with a unique layout, decoration and symbolism. It has served as a place where pilgrims could go and take the water, both physically and symbolically - the Khmer equivalent of a spa.

Vist Ta Som: built by king Jayavarman VII, a Buddhist temple (dedicated to the father of the king). It is a small, quiet temple and affords a delightful undisturbed visit. A significant feature of Ta Som is the growth of a huge ficus tree on the east gateway, which provides a dramatic example of nature and art entwined.

Visit East Mebon: built by king Rajendravarman II (reigned AD944-968) dedicated to Shiva, an ancestor temple in memory of the parents of the king. The East Mebon and its neighbour Pre Rup were built by the same king, just nine years apart, and are similar in plan, construction and decoration. A major difference, however, is that the East Mebon once stood on a small island in the middle of the Eastern Baray, which was a large body of water (2 by 7 kilometers) fed by the Siem Reap River.

Visit Pre Rup: 'turn, or change, the body', was called the 'City of the East' by Philippe Stern, the Assistant Curator of the Musee Guimet in Paris. The boldness of the architectural design is superb and gives the temple fine balance, scale and proportion. The temple is close in style to the East Mebon, although it was built several years later. it is a temple-mountain symbolising Mount Meru, the mythical mountain. The Cambodian have always regarded this temple as having funerary associations, but it is true function is uncertain. Nevertheless, the name Pre Rup recalls one of the ritual of cremation, in which the silhouette of the body of the deceased, outlined with its ashes, is successively represented according to different orientations. Some archaeologists believe that the large vat located at the base of east stairway to the central area was used at cremations. Visit Banteay Kdei: built by king Jayavarman VII was used as Buddhist monastic complex and was undoubtedly an important temple. Banteay Kdei is worth a visit as has some good carving and is less crowded than other monuments of the same period. The temple is similar in art and architecture to Ta Prohm, but it is smaller and less complex.

Day 4: Visit Banteay Srei and Kbal Spean

This petite pink temple is the jewel in the crown of Angkor-era sculture. The elaborate carvings here are the finest found in Cambodia and the name translates as '' Citadel of the Women'', thanks to the intricate detail here, considered too fine for the hands of a man. Originally believed to date from the later part of the Angkor period, inscriptions at the site suggest it was built by a Brahman in 967.

Visit Kbal Spean:

Kbal spean, referred to in English as the 'River of a Thousand Lingas', is a spectacularly carved riverbed, set deep in the jungle about 50km northeast of Angkor. It's a 2km uphill walk to the carvings. From there can walk your way back down to the waterfall to cool off.

The carving of vestiges began with the reign of King Suryavarman I and ended with the reign of King Udayadityavarman II; these two kings ruled between the 11th and 12th centuries. The 1,000 lingas, but not other sculptures, are attributed to a minister of Suryavarman I during the 11th century, and these were carved by hermits who lived in the area. Inscriptions at the site testify to the fact that most of the sculpting was done during the reign of Udayadityavarman II. It is also mentioned that King Udayadityavarman II consecrated a golden ling here in 1059 AD. It is believed that the Siem Reap River flowing into Angkor is blessed by the sacred lingas over which it flows.

The archaeological site was discovered in 1969 by Jean Boulbet, an ethnologist, but further exploration was cut off due to the Cambodian Civil War. The site regained prominence for safe visits from 1989.

Price:

1 person=$432

2people=$505

3people=$576

4people=$648

5people=$720

Inclusion:

-English speaking guide

-a good A/C car or van with a driver

-Cold pure drinking water and cold wet tissue

-four-day pass for sightseeing in Angkor

-Transfer in and out services during the tour only

-Seasonal fruit

Exclusion:

-Hotel Rates

- All other fees not mentioned above

If you have any questions related to the above itinerary, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are happy to discuss any changes.

Five-Day Visit:

Day 1: Vsit Roluos Group

The three temples of Preah Ko, Bakong and Lolei are clustered together near the modern village of Roluos, and extend over an area of three kilometers east of the Tonle Sap. The Roluos group, dating from the late ninth century, is the earliest extend site of the Angkor period that is open to visitors. The three temples belonging to this important group have similar characteristics of architecture, decoration, materials and construction methods, which combine to reveal the beginning of the classic period of Khmer art. The brick structures are decorated with magnificent sandstone deities in niches and lintels, all of which are in remarkably good condition. Preah Ko: erected by Indravarman I in the late 9th century in dedication to his defied ancestors in 879. There are inscriptions in Sanskrit on the door frame. Bakong: built and dedicated to Shiva by Indravarman I, this is the largest and most interesting of the Roluos Group temples and still has an active Buddhist monastery. Lolei: Built on an islet by Yasovarman I (who ruled from 889 to 910), the founder of the first city of Angkor. The sandstone carvings in the niches of the temple are notable as are the Sanskrit inscriptions on the doorposts. After Roluos Group your driver and your private guide will take you Artisans d'Angkor, the biggest workshop where you can enjoy their lively work of silver plating, silk weaving wood and stone carving. Artisans d’Angkor has been awarded by the highest authority for supporting craft producers: UNESCO.

Day 2: Visit Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom

Angkor Wat: built in early 12th century by king Suryavarman II (reigned 1113-1150) in dedication to Vishnu. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu monument of Angkor group and one of the most intact, is an architectural masterpiece. It perfection, balance, proportions, reliefs and sculpture make it one of the finest monuments in the world. This temple is an expression of Khmer art at its highest point development. A study has shown that when Angkor Wat was laid out by the Khmers originally, the distance between certain architectural elements of the temple reflected numbers which were related to Hindu mythology an cosmology. The positions of the bas-reliefs were regulated, for example, by solar movements. Scenes on the east-west sides reflect those relating to the rising and setting of the sun. 

Visit Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire, was grander than any city in Europe at the time and must have supported a considerable population which may have been as high as one million. Within the city walls were the residences of the king, his family and officials, military officers and priests while the rest of the people lived outside of the enclosure. The two temples evoke similar aesthetic responses yet are different in purpose, design, architecture and decoration. Zhou Daguan, the Chinese emissary who provided the only first-hand account of the Khmers, described the splendour of Angkor Thom: At the centre of the kingdom rises a Golden Tower ( Bayon) flanked by more than twenty lesser towers and several hundred stone chambers. On the eastern side is a golden bridge guarded by two lions of gold, one on each side, with eight golden Buddhas spaced along the stone chambers. Then continue to Baphuon built in the middle of 11th century dedicated to Shiva. According to Zhou Daguan, the North of the Golden Tower rises the Tower of Bronze (Baphuon), higher even than the Golden Tower: a truly astonishing spectacle, with more than ten chambers at its base. Continue to the ancient royal palace where the kings of Angkor lived. Like much of Angkor Thom, the residences of the king, and those who worked in the palace, were built of wood and have disintegrated, leaving no traces. Phimeanakas (aerial palace), located in inside the Royal Palace compound, was the temple where the king worshipped. It must originally have been crowned with golden pinnacles, as Zhou Daguan described it as the '' Tower of Gold''. Tarrace of the elephants: built in the end 12th century by Jayavarman VI, located directly in front of the Royal Palace enclosure wall. Terrace of Leper King: built in the same date of terrace of elephants and by the same king. It was used as crematorium for the king's family. Leave for Ta Keo before you continue to last most famous one ''Ta Prohm''. Ta Keo is one of the great temple-mountain at Angkor. It was never completed because it was struck by lightning. Had it been finished, Ta Keo, undoubtedly, would have been one the of the finest temples at Angkor. Ta Prohm: built by Jayavarman VI, a Buddhist monastery dedicated to his mother shrouded in the jungle, the temple of Ta Prohm is ethereal in aspect and conjures up a romantic aura. Trunks of trees twist amongst stone pillars. Fig, banyan and kapok trees spread their gigantic roots over, under and in between the stones, probing walls and terraces apart, as their branches and leaves intertwine to form a roof above the structures.

Day 3: Visit Preah Khan ( the City of Sacred Sword)

Preah Khan: the ''sacred sword'', an extensive 56 hectares Buddhist complex built in AD 1191 as a monastery and centre for learning by king Jayavarman VII (AD1181-1220) and dedicated to his father. The inscription indicates that Preah Khan was built on a battle site where Jayavarman VII finally defeated the Chams. In those days it was know as Nagarajayacri which translated from Siamese means '' The City of Preah Khan'' or ''The City of The Sacred Sword''. The sacred sword has indeed a long history in Khmer tradition. Visit Neak Pean: built by king Jayavarman VII, located in the centre of the Jayatataka '' reservoir'' called North Baray and placed on the same exis as Preah Khan. Originally, it could only be reached by boat. It is a small, somewhat out-of-the-way temple with a unique layout, decoration and symbolism. It has served as a place where pilgrims could go and take the water, both physically and symbolically - the Khmer equivalent of a spa.

Vist Ta Som: built by king Jayavarman VII, a Buddhist temple (dedicated to the father of the king). It is a small, quiet temple and affords a delightful undisturbed visit. A significant feature of Ta Som is the growth of a huge ficus tree on the east gateway, which provides a dramatic example of nature and art entwined.

Visit East Mebon: built by king Rajendravarman II (reigned AD944-968) dedicated to Shiva, an ancestor temple in memory of the parents of the king. The East Mebon and its neighbour Pre Rup were built by the same king, just nine years apart, and are similar in plan, construction and decoration. A major difference, however, is that the East Mebon once stood on a small island in the middle of the Eastern Baray, which was a large body of water (2 by 7 kilometers) fed by the Siem Reap River.

Visit Pre Rup: 'turn, or change, the body', was called the 'City of the East' by Philippe Stern, the Assistant Curator of the Musee Guimet in Paris. The boldness of the architectural design is superb and gives the temple fine balance, scale and proportion. The temple is close in style to the East Mebon, although it was built several years later. it is a temple-mountain symbolising Mount Meru, the mythical mountain. The Cambodian have always regarded this temple as having funerary associations, but it is true function is uncertain. Nevertheless, the name Pre Rup recalls one of the ritual of cremation, in which the silhouette of the body of the deceased, outlined with its ashes, is successively represented according to different orientations. Some archaeologists believe that the large vat located at the base of east stairway to the central area was used at cremations.

Day 4: Visit Banteay Srei and Kbal Spean

This petite pink temple is the jewel in the crown of Angkor-era sculture. The elaborate carvings here are the finest found in Cambodia and the name translates as '' Citadel of the Women'', thanks to the intricate detail here, considered too fine for the hands of a man. Originally believed to date from the later part of the Angkor period, inscriptions at the site suggest it was built by a Brahman in 967.

Visit Kbal Spean:

Kbal spean, referred to in English as the 'River of a Thousand Lingas', is a spectacularly carved riverbed, set deep in the jungle about 50km northeast of Angkor. It's a 2km uphill walk to the carvings. From there can walk your way back down to the waterfall to cool off.

The carving of vestiges began with the reign of King Suryavarman I and ended with the reign of King Udayadityavarman II; these two kings ruled between the 11th and 12th centuries. The 1,000 lingas, but not other sculptures, are attributed to a minister of Suryavarman I during the 11th century, and these were carved by hermits who lived in the area. Inscriptions at the site testify to the fact that most of the sculpting was done during the reign of Udayadityavarman II. It is also mentioned that King Udayadityavarman II consecrated a golden ling here in 1059 AD. It is believed that the Siem Reap River flowing into Angkor is blessed by the sacred lingas over which it flows.

The archaeological site was discovered in 1969 by Jean Boulbet, an ethnologist, but further exploration was cut off due to the Cambodian Civil War. The site regained prominence for safe visits from 1989.

Day 5: Visit Beng Mealea and Koh Ker

Visit Beng Mealea: Cambodia forgotten temple built and dedicated to a Hindu god, but there are some carvings depicting Buddhist motifs. Its primary material is sandstone and it is largely unrestored, with trees and thick brush thriving amidst its towers and courtyards and many of its stones lying in great heaps. For years it was difficult to reach, but a road recently built to the temple complex of Koh Ker passes Beng Mealea and more visitors are coming to the site, as it is 77 km from Siem Reap by road.

The history of the temple is unknown and it can be dated only by its architectural style, identical to Angkor Wat, so scholars assumed it was built during the reign of king Suryavarman II in the early 12th century. Smaller in size than Angkor Wat, the king's main monument, Beng Mealea nonetheless ranks among the Khmer Empire's larger temples: the gallery which forms the outer enclosure of the temple is 181 m by 152 m.  It was the center of a town, surrounded by a moat 1025 m by 875 m large and 45 m wide.

Beng Mealea is oriented toward the east, but has entranceways from the other three cardinal directions. The basic layout is three enclosing galleries around a central sanctuary, collapsed at present. The enclosures are tied with "cruciform cloisters", like Angkor Wat. Structures known as libraries lie to the right and left of the avenue that leads in from the east. There is extensive carving of scenes from Hindu mythology, including the Churning of the Sea of Milk and Vishnu being borne by the bird god Garuda. Causeways have long balustrades formed by bodies of the seven-headed Naga.

It was built mostly of sandstone: Beng Mealea is only 7 km far from the angkorian sandstone quarries of Phnom Kulen, as the crow flies. Presumably sandstone blocks used for Angkor were transported along artificial water canals and passed from here. Despite of lack of information, the quality of architecture and decorations has drawn the attention of French scholars just from its discovery.

Koh Ker is an Angkor site in northern Cambodia. 100 km northeast of Angkor itself, it was briefly the capital of the Khmer empire between 928 and 944 under king Jayavarrman IV and his son Hasavarman II. After the Khmer empire had been established in the Angkor area (Roluos), Jayavarman IV moved the capital in 928 almost 100 km northeast to Koh Ker. Here is a vast number of temples were built under his reign, until his successor returned to the Angkor area about 16 years later.

The Koh Ker site is dominated by Prasat Thom, a 30 meter tall temple mountain raising high above the plain and the surrounding forest. Great views await the visitor at the end of an adventurous climb. Garuda, carved into the stone blocks, still guard the very top, although they are partially covered now.

Across the site of Koh Ker there are many prasat or tower sanctuaries. A couple still feature an enormous Linga on a Yoni that provides space for several people. The outlet for the water that was sanctified by running it over the Linga can be seen in the outside wall of one of them. In other cases, three temples stand next to each other, dedicated to Brahma, Shiva and Vishnu. Most of them are surrounded by libraries and enclosures, many also had moats. At that time, the roofs were still made of wood. Today, only the holes for the beams remain in the stone structures.

The site is nearly 3 hours away from Siem Reap, the area has been demined only recently and basic visitors' facilities are just being built. This makes Koh Ker very attractive for anyone who would like to experience lonely temples partially overgrown by the forest and inhabited only by birds, calling to each other from the trees above.

Price:

1 person=$895

2people=$920

3people=$930

4people=$945

5people=$955

Inclusion:

-English speaking guide

-a good A/C car or van with a driver

-Cold pure drinking water and cold wet tissue

-Four-day pass for sightseeing in Angkor, passes for Beng Mealea and Koh Ker

-Transfer in and out services during the tour only

Exclusion:

-Hotel Rates

- All other fees not mentioned above

If you have any questions related to the above itinerary, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are happy to discuss any changes.